[Solved] Photoelectric effect ¬ Question #1  

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To get the Quantum ball rolling (or not rolling you never know) I thought we could start with one of the earliest experiments which hinted upon the quantum nature of reality. The photoelectric effect was of course discovered by Einstein, and he won the 1905 Nobel prize for it. It showed that light comes in energy packets "quanta" and showed that light behaves as a particle (sometimes).

This is a super simple question to begin with!

Light of wavelength 320 nm is shone on a plate of Caesium (Φ = 3.04x10^-19 J). What is the maximum velocity of the electrons that leave the surface of the metal?

My solution is attached but have a go!

PlanckTime - Amin

 
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Easy... I got ideas on how to make this alot tougher though 😉

 

Worked on the miniboard today, because why not?

"Either this wallpaper goes, or I go"- Oscar Wilde's last words

 
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Good Stuff Saeed, we had to start somewhere ?

PlanckTime - Amin

 
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This is a really easy one.  What did Einstein test this photoelectric effect on?  To do or not to do that is the question.

 
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Man, this one is a toughie for people who haven't fully gotten into the math(s) of things like this. But I tried my best. I don't have a reference picture, but I got a total of 8*10^5 ms^-1. I checked, and my math(s) is pretty similar to Plank's.

That one guy that's always on

 
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He used a gold leaf and an zinc plate on which he shone UV radiation I think, as electrons are liberated due to the photoelectric effect the zinc becomes positively charged and attracts the gold leaf, which then falls to the plate.

PlanckTime - Amin

 
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The effect was known but not quantified before. Einstein did the experiments to show exactly when it happened, and then he used the solution plank had come up with in his solution to the UV catastrophe. It fit the data perfectly.

 

All in all, it was known that something weird was going on. No one knew what exactly, until einstein's golden leaf experiments

"Either this wallpaper goes, or I go"- Oscar Wilde's last words

 
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